Does Social Media Impacts Productivity at Workplace?

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Social Media Impact on Productivity - TaskQue Blog

You must have been reading different articles about productivity hacks at work over the Internet for quite some time but this article is a little different in a sense that it reflects the community viewpoint. We asked these questions to various professionals and influencers about their biggest distraction at the workplace. Unfortunately, most of us are so addicted to social media that we neglect the negative aspects altogether. Below we have the best answers compiled at one place:

Let’s have a look at what people think about social media’s impact on productivity:

What Experts Says?

Hitesh Aasnani, the most viewed writer on personal productivity apps, says:

Yes. But deciding that depends on following things:

On your role

If you are a CEO, Marketing Manager, Social Media Manager, etc. then it is actually part of your work. Apart from this, I believe you are there to work and you have your breaks or should have fixed breaks where you can browse through your social media accounts/ timelines.

How you distinguish between different social media platforms

Quora (However there is a debate on whether quora is social media or not) for a fact is social media but it is a useful one in the context you are using it, but it is not true with Twitter or FB.

Having prioritized intervals in which you use/check social media is fine, I believe. And it is always in the end, how much sincerity you show to your work! Also how much you are delivering work on time, decides whether usage of social media actually is a distraction at workplace or not! Cheers.

Zac Scy, Time Management & Productivity Coach for companies & people in various fields says:

While it can be a distraction, it can also be used as a powerful tool to interact with and scout for potential customers, clients, and/or contacts.

If you can use it to figure out who the person you’re selling to is, what their interests are and what their values are, then you’re in a much better position than just hitting up them at random or trying to figure them out during the call/meeting/interaction.

How we behave and express ourselves through social media can be used to connect on a deeper level and build trust.

That being said, there’s a thin line between purposefully wanting to get to know your customers and flat out being a creep about it.

 

Jessee Beighley,  says:

When it comes to the workplace, you have entered into an agreement to provide labor and time for money. It is unethical to ignore this agreement and play around on social media instead leaving your tasks undone. Furthermore, if you don’t show an ability to complete tasks quickly and well, then you won’t gain raises and promotion. Using a office computer can land you in hot waters

On the No. 1 network for project managers, i.e. projectmanagement.com, experts share their views:

Blake Swopes, says:

Sure, but people need distractions. I never really saw an issue with people briefly checking in on social media when switching between tasks.

My last few jobs had chat rooms for our team and it was full of news articles and other items of interest that people were posting. We can still do a lot of work.

The only problem I ever saw was one guy who basically spent all his time watching Anime in a small window. He still had his work up but rarely did any actual work whenever I looked his direction.

Zac Scy, Time Management & Productivity Coach for companies & people in various fields says:

While it can be a distraction it can also be used as a powerful tool to interact with and scout for potential customers, clients, and/or contacts.

If you can use it to figure out who the person you’re selling to is, what their interests are and what their values are, then you’re in a much better position than just hitting up them at random or trying to figure them out during the call/meeting/interaction.

How we behave and express ourselves through social media can be used to connect on a deeper level and build trust.

That being said, there’s a thin line between knowing your customers and being a creep about it.

Andrew Craig, PMP certified says:

Fortunately, Social media is not what i love. I’ll browse Reddit at lunch while listening to podcasts, and use Twitter as a news aggregator, other than that, I’m on this community.

Its not distracting because I integrate my breaks with my work activities and priorities. It certainly is not a priority. I have plenty of time while at home or on my commute.

Anupam Ganguly, Microsoft certified professional says:

I am not much active on social media. I like this portal, as there is lot of learning involved. Lots of good stuff and resources available here, videos, articles, white papers, journals, etc. Time flies when I go through these. It gives me personal satisfaction.

Maria T Mata-Sivera, Project Manager at MTM Consulting says:

There is a different approach to what it means “distraction” and how to manage it, depending on the country and the team.

For example, I’ve worked in companies that you don’t have access to Social Media as Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn,. Smartphones are enough to distract people.

It is normal to take a coffee break during the day in Italy. That is not the case in Germany.

Nowadays there are big companies using Workplace by facebook, then…after some $$ of inversion, it will be worthy or a distraction…Again, depending on the country and the team!

Stéphane Parent, Senior Project Manager at MAXIMUS says:

I subscribe to suppliers’ Facebook page to stay abreast of news and changes.

When I am a resource manager, I often use LinkedIn to not only find potential recruits but also to stay abreast of a particular group’s concerns and challenges.

I also use this community to help with content, resources and as a sounding board.

When we asked on Facebook Productivity in the Tech Community, they replied as follows:

Jay Miller says:

Of course it depends on the job. Part of my responsibilities to PIT and other communities I manage are to keep up with social media.

I make time for it but I try not to fall in “rabbit holes” have an agenda, complete the agenda then get off the thing.

Scott Friesen  says:

Anything can be a distraction in the workplace. Spending too much time with email often takes us away from our most important work. Your boss or a co-worker may be your biggest distraction if they can’t stop interrupting you throughout the day. Social Media is often the ‘poster child’ for workplace distraction, but we must admit that it’s just one of many.

Jimmy Reekes III says:

Social Media is one of many workplace distractions. I’m lucky that I don’t have to deal with a lot of company email or internet related distractions, except for between flights and even then it may be a limited time.

Severine Lee says:

Social media has its place at work and at home. Like anything else it needs to be done with purpose and mindfulness. It’s only a distraction if you let it. Notifications are a distraction too but they have their purpose.

Conclusion:

You might have figured out that it usually depends on the nature of the job after reading this article. People with social media job titles finds productivity in using social media. On the other hand, others suggest to limit its use in office hours. So, we can say that a balanced use is necessary for not to making it a distraction.

 

 

 

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